CallJam Malware Infects Androids and Keeps Ringing Premium Rate Numbers

A new mobile malware known as “CallJam” loves to continuously hit up premium phone numbers from the Android devices it infects.

Just like other Android trojans (such as Android.Xiny.19.origin and the DroidJack remote access tool), CallJam likes to masquerade as downloadable games in the official Google Play Store.Continue Reading…

0Shares

Stealing Login Credentials From a Locked PC or Mac Just Got Easier

Snatching the login credentials of a locked computer just got easier and faster, thanks to a technique that requires only $50 worth of hardware and takes less than 30 seconds to carry out.  “First off, this is dead simple and shouldn’t work, but it does,” mubix wrote in a blog post published Tuesday. “Also, there is no possible way that I’m the first one that has identified this, but here it is (trust me, I tested it so many ways to confirm it because I couldn’t believe it was true).”

Continue Reading…

0Shares

Just One Photo Can Silently Hack Millions Of Androids

Google released a bunch of Android patches today, covering off some previously-disclosed issues including the worrying Quadrooter bugs that affected 900 million phones. But another, previously-unknown critical weakness has been covered too and you’ll want to download the patch now because the hack can be delivered hidden inside an innocuous-looking photo in a social media or chat app. A victim wouldn’t even have to click on the evil photo: as soon as its data was parsed by the phone, it’d quietly let a remote hacker take over the device or simply brick it.Continue Reading…

0Shares

Hacker’s Tool of the Month: The Rubber Ducky

What could you do if you only had a few seconds or minutes at someone’s computer? Turns out a lot, if you have a Rubber Ducky USB drive and it works on Windows, Mac, Linux or Android systems. With pre-loaded scripts you can steal and crack windows system passwords, grab Wifi or network credentials, upload malware, keystroke loggers or just about anything else a skilled hacker could do if he had access to your computer, but in only seconds. It was recently used on Mr. Robot for just that purpose.

Continue Reading…

0Shares